Working with Aboriginal Elders (Based on the Teachings of Winnipeg-Area Aboriginal Elders and Cultural Teachers)
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Working with Aboriginal Elders (Based on the Teachings of Winnipeg-Area Aboriginal Elders and Cultural Teachers) by Jonathan H. Ellerby

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Published by Native Studies Press .
Written in


Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages86
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11768198M
ISBN 100968613829

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Working with Elders and Indigenous Knowledge Systems: A Reader and Guide for Places of Higher Learning provides the reader with an opportunity to de-mystify this work. This book is a gift for administrators and faculty alike who are taking those first tentative steps to decolonizing their thinking about our collective work in the academy. Kinanaskomom. Shauneen Peet, PhD Associate Professor (Aboriginal Education. Working with aboriginal elders: an introductory handbook for institution-based and health care professionals based on the teachings of Winnipeg-area aboriginal elders and cultural teachers (Book, ) [] Get this from a library! Working with aboriginal elders: an introductory handbook for institution-based and health care professionals based on the teachings of Winnipeg-area aboriginal elders and cultural teachers / Jonathan H. Ellerby. Working Effectively with Indigenous Peoples® The 4th edition of our very popular book expands upon the previous editions with additional content, insight, our trademarked RESPECT training model, and suggestions on what one should do and what one should avoid doing when communicating and working with Indigenous Peoples.

Working with Aboriginal Communities provides advice on how to start this process and encourage a relationship with the local Aboriginal community. Observing appropriate protocols when working with Aboriginal people and their communities is critical to establishing positive and respectful relationships. Guidelines for Working with First Nation, Metis and Inuit Elders and Knowledge Keepers. In First Nations, Métis, and Inuit cultures, Elders and traditional teachers play a prominent, vital, and respected role. They are held in high regard as they are the knowledge keepers, carrying traditional teachings and information passed down through oral history, customs and traditions which encompass beliefs, . work with Aboriginal people in the future. Aboriginal culture and communities are diverse and there are many different nations, tribes and groups living in NSW. In view of this a ‘one size fits all’ approach will not work and we need to tailor our ways of working and communicating to meet the needs of the individuals and communities concerned.   Non-Aboriginal people working in remote Aboriginal communities often lack proper awareness of Aboriginal protocols. It has been suggested that these workers take part in cultural awareness training to qualify for a black card, similar to the "blue card" which qualifies people to work with children (through a police check).

Elders is a series of chapters authored by tribal elders from around Australia. They speak simply and movingly, and his visually stunning photography supports their words. Elders is a book to. When working with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, Service providers need to get to know the Elders and other key Indigenous contacts in Government and non-Government departments. It is important to take time in establishing credibility within the Aboriginal community by building trust and respect and demonstrating that you are there to get to know and assist their . Books shelved as indigenous-people: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie, There There by Tommy Orange, Fry Bread: A Native A. This is a very important picture book telling the remarkable story of the Aboriginal warrior Jandamarra who led his people against the station owners and Police who were encroaching further and further on the land of the Bunuba people in the rugged Kimberley region of north-west Australia.